Mingo Logo Formerly SensrTrx
Search
Close this search box.

Industrial Internet of Things: Manufacturing Explained

The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is a transformative manufacturing strategy that helps to improve quality, safety, and productivity in the industrial sector. It’s a network of intelligent computers, devices, and objects that collect and share huge amounts of data. The collected data is sent to a central Cloud-based service where it is aggregated with other data and then shared with end users in a helpful way. The IIoT will revolutionize manufacturing by improving efficiency, safety, and productivity.

IIoT is a part of a larger concept known as the Internet of Things (IoT). The IoT is a network of intelligent computers, devices, and objects that collect and share huge amounts of data. The collected data is sent to a central Cloud-based service where it is aggregated with other data and then shared with end users in a helpful way. The IoT will revolutionize industries and our lives by improving efficiency, safety, and productivity.

Key Components of IIoT

The Industrial Internet of Things is made up of several key components. At the end of the day, it’s about machines, data, and how that data is used to improve efficiency and productivity. But it’s also about the intelligent, networked machines that communicate and coordinate their activities.

Firstly, there are the intelligent machines themselves. Not only can these machines carry out their tasks without human intervention, but they also generate data that can be analyzed and used to improve their efficiency and productivity. This data can then be used to predict failures and allow for preventative maintenance, thereby reducing downtime and increasing productivity.

Networks and Communication

The second component of the IIoT is the networked communication between the machines. This is the infrastructure that allows the data to flow between the machines and the central data service. This communication is typically wireless and uses standard internet-based protocols.

Finally, there is the central service that receives, processes, and distributes the data. This can be a Cloud-based service or it can be an in-house service. This service is responsible for making sense of the data and providing useful and actionable information to the end users.

Data and Analytics

Data, and more importantly, the ability to make sense of it, is at the heart of the IIoT. Machines generate huge amounts of data, and this data is very diverse in nature. It can be temperature readings, times of operation, or failures. But it’s not the amount of data that’s important. It’s what we can do with that data that matters. This is where analytics come into play.

Analytics can be descriptive, predictive, or prescriptive. Descriptive analytics looks at what has happened in the past and uses that to help predict what will happen in the future. Predictive analytics uses models to forecast what will happen in the future, while prescriptive analytics uses models to specify optimal behaviors and actions.

Benefits of IIoT in Manufacturing

The IIoT holds great potential for improving productivity and efficiency in the manufacturing sector. By connecting machines and using data analytics, manufacturers can predict and prevent equipment failures, dramatically reducing downtime. They can also optimize machine performance and improve product quality.

Another significant benefit of the IIoT is that it enables manufacturers to make real-time decisions based on comprehensive and up-to-the-minute data. This ability can dramatically improve productivity, as well as quality and safety.

Reduced Downtime

One of the key benefits of the IIoT is the ability to predict equipment failures before they happen. By analyzing machine data, manufacturers can identify patterns and predict failures. This allows them to schedule maintenance in advance, thereby reducing downtime.

Not only does this improve efficiency, but it also reduces costs. Unscheduled downtime can be very expensive, not just in terms of lost production, but also in terms of emergency maintenance work, overtime costs, and the impact on customer service.

Improved Efficiency

Another key benefit of the IIoT is the ability to optimize machine performance. By monitoring machine performance in real-time, manufacturers can identify inefficiencies and make adjustments to improve productivity. This can be as simple as adjusting the speed of a machine, or as complex as using machine learning algorithms to optimize a production line.

Efficiency gains can also be made by reducing energy consumption. By monitoring energy usage in real-time, manufacturers can identify and eliminate wasteful practices, thereby reducing costs and improving sustainability.

Challenges and Risks of IIoT

While the IIoT holds great potential, it also presents significant challenges and risks. One of the biggest challenges is the sheer volume of data that is generated. This data needs to be managed and analyzed in a timely and efficient manner. It also needs to be stored securely and in compliance with all relevant regulations.

Another challenge is the integration of different technologies. The IIoT involves a complex mix of hardware, software, and networking technologies. These technologies need to work together seamlessly. This requires a high level of technical skill and expertise.

Data Management and Analysis

One of the biggest challenges of the IIoT is managing and analyzing the huge volumes of data that are generated. This data needs to be collected, processed, stored, and analyzed in a timely and efficient manner. It also needs to be stored securely and in compliance with all relevant regulations.

Data analysis is a complex and specialized field. It requires a high level of technical skill and expertise. There is also a shortage of skilled data scientists, which can make it difficult for manufacturers to get the most out of their data.

Integration of Technologies

Another challenge is the integration of different technologies. The IIoT involves a complex mix of hardware, software, and networking technologies. These technologies need to work together seamlessly. This requires a high level of technical skill and expertise.

There is also the challenge of legacy systems. Many manufacturers have existing systems that were not designed to be networked or to handle large volumes of data. Integrating these systems with the IIoT can be complex and costly.

Future of IIoT in Manufacturing

The future of the IIoT in manufacturing looks bright. As technology continues to improve and become more affordable, more manufacturers will be able to take advantage of the benefits of the IIoT. This will lead to improved efficiency, productivity, and quality, and reduced costs.

However, the future is not without challenges. Manufacturers will need to invest in the necessary technologies and skills. They will also need to manage the risks associated with data security and compliance. But with the right approach, the benefits of the IIoT can far outweigh the challenges.

Technological Advancements

Technology is at the heart of the IIoT, and as technology continues to improve, so too will the capabilities of the IIoT. We can expect to see improvements in data analytics, machine learning, and artificial intelligence. These technologies will enable manufacturers to get even more out of their data.

We can also expect to see improvements in the technologies that enable the IIoT. Faster and more reliable networks will enable more data to be transmitted and processed. Smarter and more efficient machines will generate more useful data. And more powerful and user-friendly software will make it easier for manufacturers to manage and analyze their data.

Increased Adoption

As the benefits of the IIoT become more apparent, we can expect to see more manufacturers adopting this technology. This will be driven by a desire to improve efficiency and productivity, reduce costs, and stay competitive.

However, adoption will not be without its challenges. Manufacturers will need to invest in the necessary technologies and skills. They will also need to manage the risks associated with data security and compliance. But with the right approach, the benefits of the IIoT can far outweigh the challenges.

Ready to harness the power of the Industrial Internet of Things and transform your manufacturing operations? Look no further than Mingo Smart Factory, the most user-friendly and rapidly deployable manufacturing system you’ll ever need. With Mingo, you can enjoy the benefits of a plug-and-play solution that’s customizable to your unique needs, without the necessity for dedicated IT support. Connect to your existing equipment or utilize our hardware for seamless data collection, even on older machines. Take the first step towards a paperless factory, reduced costs, and improved efficiency. Discover how Mingo works and start your journey to a smarter, more productive manufacturing environment today.

Picture of Bryan Sapot
Bryan Sapot
Bryan Sapot is a lifelong entrepreneur, speaker, CEO, and founder of Mingo. With more than 24 years of experience in manufacturing technology, Bryan is known for his deep manufacturing industry insights. Throughout his career, he’s built products and started companies that leveraged technology to solve problems to make the lives of manufacturers easier. Follow Bryan on LinkedIn here.